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throughjo:

on surfaces covered with stone…

a radio broadcasting station by Archium [(www.dezeen.com)]

— 13 hours ago with 114 notes
#stone  #nepali architecture  #let light in 

hideback:

Frank Lloyd Wright (American, 1867-1959)

Rose Pauson House, Phoenix, Arizona, 1939-1941

The Rose Pauson House is one of many tragic losses in Frank Lloyd Wright’s career. Despite taking nearly 3 years to design and build, the house lasted only 1 year. It burned in a catastrophic fire in 1943.

After the fire, the stone ruins persisted on the prominent Phoenix hillsite for over 30 years. Covered in tags, the area was called “Ship Rock.” The ultimate desecration of the site occurred when the ruins were moved to a nearby housing development to become the entrance sign for “Alta Vista Estates” (bottom photo).

— 13 hours ago with 434 notes
#american architecture  #stone  #landscape  #Nature & Architecture 

stevemccurrystudios:

"To read is to fly: it is to soar to a point of vantage which gives a view over wide terrains of history, human variety, ideas, shared experience and the fruits of many inquiries. 

 - A C Grayling, Financial Times (in a review of A History of Reading by Alberto Manguel)

Please visit our Wordpress blog:

http://www.stevemccurry.wordpress.com

— 13 hours ago with 709 notes
#reading space 

rudygodinez:

Craig Atkinson, Five Page Spreads from his Zine “London, Alexandra Road Estate”, (2013)

Atkinson’s zine was published by his own imprint, “Café Royal Books” in an edition of 150.

— 13 hours ago with 89 notes
#british architecture  #public architecture  #affordable architecture  #concrete  #street life 

620 Wickham st, Brisbane, AUS

Riddel Architecture restoration of a 1953 Furniture showroom originally by Karl Langer.

Bottom photos show the original showroom and what  it had morphed into before restoration.

Read more about the project here

— 1 day ago with 6 notes
#Australian Architecture  #modernist  #heritage architecture  #restoration  #let light in  #at the water's edge 

ryanpanos:

Makoko; a Floating city in Nigeria | Via

The shanty town of Makoko is located on a lagoon on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, a stone’s throw from the modern buildings that make up Lagos, the biggest town in Nigeria and the main commercial and industrial center. In this sprawling slum on the waterfront, adjacent to the 10 km long Third Mainland Bridge, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses raised on slits. There are no official census records, but estimates suggest some 150,000 to 250,000 people live here.

For decades, residents in Makoko have had no access to basic infrastructure, including clean drinking water, electricity and waste disposal, and prone to severe environmental and health hazards. Communal latrines are shared by about 15 households and wastewater, excreta, kitchen waste and polythene bags go straight into the water they’ve lived on top of. The only way to get potable water is to buy them from vendors who get it from boreholes. The government provides no free water to Makoko residents. Indeed, the government doesn’t want Makoko residents living there at all. On July, 2012, the government swooped into the low-lying coastal community and demolished many of the floating houses and other illegal structures. The officials cited health and sanitation concerns, but some locals suspect that the underlying motivation is a desire to sell off the area lucratively to property developers.

The media outcry following the demolition and the community’s protest led the state government to announce a regeneration plan to provide accommodation for 250,000 people and employment opportunities for a further 150,000. Recently, a team of architects (NLE Architects) devised a floating school built from plastic barrels that has space for classrooms as well as play area.

— 2 days ago with 249 notes
#nigerian architecture  #at the water's edge 

I don’t think i’ve ever seen unpainted timber VJs in a Queenslander - but I like it! Especially with the typical white paint.

Photos by Elizabeth Santillan, of ‘Cooroon’, Highgate Hill, Brisbane.

— 2 days ago with 5 notes
#queenslander  #heritage architecture  #timber & tin  #timber  #Australian Architecture  #vernacular architecture 

Good solution for dealing with smooth / textured - new / old junctions.

— 3 days ago with 5 notes
#stone  #architectural details  #heritage architecture